Patagonia, Thursday, April 17, 2014

Detailed Information about Whales in Patagonia

Whale Stories
Text: Pablo Etchevers
On a journey back in history, we find whales drawn in caves in Norway back in 2,200 BC. According to data found in Alaska, it is known that the Eskimos used to hunt whales 3,400 years ago.

  Literature has immortalized whaling through Moby Dick, the brilliant novel by Herman Melville, in which a group of hunters tries to catch a big white whale that ends up defeating them without even losing its freedom -the most precious asset for all cetaceans.

Towards 1725, the first whale expedition set out from Dundee (Scotland) towards the southern Atlantic. Whaling, sea lion and seal hunting by foreigners -especially English and Americans- in our seas became intense after 1750. It all started in Malvinas and continued towards the Patagonian shores up to Cape Horn, Staten Island and other islands. They always proceeded with complete impunity.
Southern Right Whale
It is estimated that before whaling, there were about 100,000 specimens of right whale. As a result of the slaughter and the slow recovery rhythm of the group (as females bear a calf every three years), the right whale is the most endangered of the eleven whale species existing today.

The species has been protected since 1935. In 1946, the International Whaling Commission was created and most whaling nations joined it. In 1982, the members of the Whaling Commission finally signed a moratorium in England which prohibited whaling worldwide from 1985 to 1990. As a result of this measure, the number of whales could be verified and a possible increase in their population could be estimated.

  If the products obtained from whales have their substitutes on solid ground, we wonder why this terrible irrational slaughter that exterminates the sea giants still takes place.
Southern Right Whale
Is it not worth enjoying, watching or listening to their greatness?

Ballena Franca Austral

Slow, Very Slow

Curious and calm, the southern right whales swim slowly across the cold waters of the southern seas at a maximum speed of 9 to 11 kilometers per hour. Very slowly. Nevertheless, this is an ideal speed for tourists to take pictures and videos of their movements and jumps.
My Trip in photos

Enter Interpatagonia’s photographic community and leave your picture to share it with the thousands of visitors that surf our site everyday. Tourist attractions, emblematic sceneries, beautiful cities and unforgettable situations are some of the many instances displayed by the photographs readers upload. Yours is asking to be here too.

Read more...
Photo Show

There is a special section in Interpatagonia for lovers of photography and the adventure of discovering places, sceneries and tourist attractions. The idea is that you surf this section and watch the work done by our team of reporters and photographers and that you start planning your next trip to some of these destinations.

Read more...
 
Inter Patagonia - Information on whales in Patagonia
© 2002-2014 Total or partial reproduction forbidden. Derechos de Autor 675245 Ley 11723

Share on Twitter Follow InterPatagonia on Twitter
Share on Facebook InterPatagonia on facebook: Like
Subscribe to our YouTube channel InterPatagonia Videos on YouTube
Follow us in Google+